Pictures and stories of a big city

The online portal on the city’s history

1000 photographs from the collections of the Berlin district museums and the Berlin City Museum provide a fascinating insight into the city’s history. On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of Greater Berlin, they tell of a city that was merged from cities, rural communities and manor districts by a parliamentary resolution in 1920. 150 thematic photo series show how the image of Berlin has changed from the Weimar Republic to the present day. They reflect the diversity of the faces of Berlin from the edge to the center, from the neighborhoods to the city center. 50 illustrated biographies of Berliners illustrate the social, cultural and political upheavals people in East and West have experienced. Visitors to the portal can make their personal Berlin visible by uploading their own photographs. In close cooperation between the Stadtmuseum Berlin and the Berlin district museums, 1000x Berlin has created an illustrated one-hundred-year history of the city, compact and digital.

 

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A project within:
Funded by:

Fig. 1: The last horse market in Spandau, Pichelsdorfer Strasse and the corner of Betckestrasse, Wilhelmstadt, 1929, Photo: Spandau District Office © Archive of the Spandau City History Museum
Fig. 2: Flea market on Askanierring, 1985, photo: Claus Rehfeld, Spandau press office © Archive of the Spandau City History Museum
Fig. 3: Staaken sports field opened in 1970, photo: Claus Rehfeld, Spandau press office © Archive of the Spandau City History Museum
Fig. 4: Spandau butchers’ guild, 1929, photo: Spandau district office © Archive of the Spandau City History Museum
Fig. 5: Violin maker Andreas Zimmermann, Breite Straße 35, Spandau, 1986, photo: Claus Rehfeld, Spandau press office © Archive of the Spandau City History Museum
Fig. 6: Historic wine cellar Alt-Pichelsdorf, Wilhelmstadt, around 1978, photo: O. Türck © Archive of the Spandau City History Museum
Fig. 7: New Year’s Eve celebration in Spandau, Werner family, 1930, photo: Spandau district office © Archive of the Spandau City History Museum
Fig. 8: Askanierring Spandau flea market, 1985, photo: Claus Rehfeld, Spandau press office © Archive of the Spandau City History Museum

Jein Danke! – the exhibition

When the “Law on the Formation of a New City of Berlin” came into force on October 1st, 1920, Berlin became a cosmopolitan city – not least with the help of the city of Spandau. Suddenly the area of ​​the city increased tenfold, the population grew to 3.8 million. But why did Spandau so oppose its incorporation? What other topics were important in Spandau in the 1920s – and sometimes seem surprisingly topical? There are e.g. Housing shortage, nature conservation versus building land, connection to a public transport network, work at Siemens and clashes between left and right extremes.

From September 13th, 2020 to May 15th, 2021 you can deal with special stories in the exhibition that are fundamental for the change from the stubborn city to the self-deprecating part of Berlin. How durable is the now hundred-year-old Spandau obstinacy actually? And what developments will this charming district go through by 2120?

Quadrat-Jein-Danke © Stadtgeschichtliches Museum Spandau, 2020 Grafik: Sven Lindhorst-Emme

Archive

The Archive of the City History Museum Spandau is located in the attic of the Palas. It is a point of interest for all who wish to learn about the history or certain historical aspects of the former city and now district of Spandau and it’s surroundings. The archive’s most extensive collections consists of old council documents, newspapers, photographs, maps and blueprints as well as a library. A more detailed overview provided in German is available here.

Page from the city council protocoll book of Spandau from 1712, photo: Friedhelm Hoffmann © Archiv Stadtgeschichtliches Museum, Zitadelle Spandau