Ingo Ronkholz / Der tatsächliche Raum

19.1.2019 – 23.4.2019

ZAK Center for Contemporary Art – Gallery, ground floor 2

 

The exhibition, Der tatsächliche Raum, exemplary brings together sculptures and drawings by the sculptor, Ingo Ronkholz, who was born in 1953 in Krefeld and died in the summer of 2018. In 1998, he exhibited his works for the first time in Berlin on a larger scale. A selection of the works that have been created since 2002 will give a deeper insight into the artist’s fascinating ways of working and thinking and can now be seen in the posthumous solo exhibition at the ZAK. Ingo Ronkholz first studied art from 1970-74 at the Werkkunstschule Krefeld, and then from 1974-78 he studied art at the Staatliche Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. His artistic work moves within the coordinates of a geometric-constructive canon. The preferred sculptural materials are bronze and iron, in the drawing the preferred materials are oil-impregnated and collaged paper. Thus, in addition to numerous sculptures and wall works, a parallel and extremely independent graphic work is created, which goes far beyond the classical sculptor’s drawings. Both in the three-dimensional form as well as in his works on paper, Ingo Ronkholz has consistently devoted himself to questions of spatial setups and image-finding. In the process, he dissolves the volumes in favor of the internal qualities. From the masterly interplay between line, volume and space arise highly complex forms. The exhibition remembers with numerous loans from the Kunstmuseum Bochum and the estate of the artist an important German sculptor of the present time.

 

We thank Ms. Jona Koenen-Ronkholz and the Kunstmuseum Bochum for their generous support during the preparations and the realization of the exhibition.
Supported by a funding from Senate Department for Culture and Europe / Department of Culture.
Ronkholz1
ill.: Ingo Ronkholz, Ohne Titel, 2014, bronze from lost form
Das lange Gebäude der Alten Kaserne, Foto: Zitadelle Berlin, Friedhelm Hoffmann

Location

ZAK Center for Contemporary Art // Old Barracks

standortplan-alte-kaserne